Singapore to boast of world’s biggest dome

The National Stadium is expected to be completed in 2014. (Photo courtesy of Arup)The National Stadium is expected to be completed in 2014. (Photo courtesy of Arup)

The new Singapore National Stadium is set to be the world's largest dome structure.

On schedule and slated for completion in 2014, the centerpiece of the Sports Hub will boast of a 310-metre wide steel dome roof.

That will make it 35-metres wider than the Cowboys Stadium in Texas, which currently has the bragging rights as the world's biggest dome structure.

Also revealed on Thursday at the Experience Centre by Arup, its global design, engineering and business consultancy, is that construction of the National Stadium roof has got underway and is expected to be completed by November next year.

Construction of the National Stadium roof is underway. (Photo courtesy of Arup)Construction of the National Stadium roof is underway. (Photo courtesy of Arup)

The dome with its retractable roof will not only provide shade and shelter to the 55,000-seat stadium and surrounding non-ticketed community spaces, but also "under seat cooling" where cooled air will be supplied under the seats of the spectators.

It will be the only stadium in the world, custom-built to host football, rugby, athletic and cricket in one venue.

The dome will provide shade and shelter to the 55,000-seat stadiumThe dome will provide shade and shelter to the 55,000-seat stadium

On the challenges in designing the National Stadium, Clive Lewis, Arup's lead venue designer for the Singapore Sports Hub admitted, "The tropical climate in Singapore poses a challenge in the design of the National Stadium.

"People will only enjoy the stadium experience if the environmental conditions are right. We wanted to keep the rain and heat out, but we also wanted it to be an open and dynamic space.

"After extensive research into comfort expectations and energy in use, we realised that a naturally ventilated stadium with localised cooling gave us the best solution for the local climate in Singapore.

"By incorporating a moving roof, the stadium will be further protected from the harsh climatic conditions, allowing events to be hosted during the hottest parts of the day," he added.

The Sports Hub, which consists of two indoor arenas, an aquatics centre and a large shopping mall, is expected to cost S$1.33billion to build.

When completed, the National Stadium is set to hold international sporting events such as Twenty20 cricket and is the confirmed venue for the 2015 Southeast Asian Games.