Blog Posts by Kelly Dwyer

  • You’re in your second semester of AP Basketball History, you love really good teams, and you love lists. With precious little drama left in the NBA’s 2015 offseason, why don’t we hit the barroom and/or barbershop, pour ourselves a frosty mug of Barbicide, and get to arguin’ over each franchise’s most formidable starting five-man lineup.

    [Follow Dunks Don't Lie on Tumblr: The best slams from all of basketball]

    Because we don’t like making tough decisions, the lineups will reflect the All-NBA line of thinking. There will be no differentiation between separate forward and guard positions, and the squads will be chosen after careful consideration of individual merits only – we don’t really care if your team’s top shooting guard and point guard don’t get along.

    These rankings will roll out based on when each franchise began its NBA life. We continue with the New York Knicks, a team that nearly traded its spot on the island for some nutmeg, trinkets, and two unprotected first-round picks.

    Read More »from The NBA's all-time starting five: New York Knicks
  • Apparently Michael Jordan doesn’t own the right to the basketball airwaves he once called his own. Not in China, at least

    [Follow Dunks Don't Lie on Tumblr: The best slams from all of basketball]

    The Basketball Hall of Famer and Charlotte Hornets owner lost a lawsuit against a Chinese footwear maker named Qiaodan Sports Co., following a suit he filed in 2012. “Quiodan” apparently is a rough Mandarin translation of the name “Jordan,” and the brand’s logo just happened to feature a dude jumping through the air while holding a basketball.

    From a report culled from Sohu:

    "'Jordan' is not the only possible reference for 'Qiaodan' in the trademark under dispute," it cited a transcript of the verdict as saying.

    "In addition, 'Jordan' is a common surname used by Americans," the court added according to the report Monday, and the logo was in the shape of a person with no facial features, so that it was "hard" for consumers to identify it as Jordan.

    There was insufficient evidence to prove

    Read More »from Michael Jordan loses out in a Chinese footwear trademark suit

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